Sailing Around The World

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Day 3 “Relief”

It was a wet evening taking in the odd white capped wave into the cockpit every hour. BUt at last around mid morning the wind dropped down to the mid 20kts and sometime we see high teen wind speed. The good news is that at the winds current angle we are making a easy 7.5kts average, so we are ripping off the mileage now. All is well.

Thanks,

Jacques

Current Position: UTC 18:19, 30deg 21.1min S, 12deg 29.5min E, SOG 7.8kts, COG 322deg-M, 1018MB, WS 20 to 25kts, Swell <2meters, Clear skies

Day 2 Passage to BVI WINDY

We are making good speed but have had really strong winds and big waves tossing us around. I hope by tomorrow we will be out of the westerly band that shadows South Africa. Did have some fun last evening when our freezer control thermostat broke because a few drops of salt water shorted it out. I spent the evening and morning rebuilding it with old parts and we seem to be back in business. Rocken and Rolling Jacques and Cary

Current Position: UTC 18:67, 32deg 0.5min S, 15deg 8.4min E, COG 327deg-M, SOG 7.1kts, WS 25 to 35kts gusting to 40kts, Swell 2 to 6 meters, 1015MB

Cape Town To The Caribbean 50 Days At Sea

The Sailing Route for the next 50 days

The Sailing Route for the next 50 days

To let you all know my friends/crew Jade, Ben, and Sarah have departed Dragopnsbane to do some land traveling in Africa and I wish them best of luck. As for Cary and I we are on the eve of our last major passage that will take us from Cape Town South Africa to the Caribbean BVI Tortola Island over the course of 50 days. We will sail a total of 5,990 nautical miles short handed. We will run on four hour shifts, 4 on 4 off and work together in situations that require two people. This will be a fun challenge and will also complete my world circumnavigation of 2.5 years. I am glad to have my good friend Cary on baord to help stay the course. So that said I will post updates on our passage as often as I can but I will not have the energy to do daily post but I will try.

Thank you,

Jacques & Cary

East London to Mossel Bay South Africa Passage “STORMS, WHALES, 50KTS WINDS, WAVES”

Thunderstorm at night 45kts wind and 4 meter swell plus

Thunderstorm at night 45kts wind and 4 meter swell plus


Based on our experience from our last passage out in the Auglhas current, swell, and weather we decided to go for it in the next available weather window. The weather looked good for a 48 hour period. We could complete the next 320 nautical mile passage in that window but it would be close. The weather began with 25kts on our backs with 2 meter waves. The barometer read 1017MB and rising, good news. We made quick work of the first 120 nautical miles passing Port Elizabeth 15 nautical miles off our Starboard and barometer read 1022MB. By mid afternoon when I came on watch the barometer had fell to 1018MB in only a few hours. The wind was now a constant 35kts right on our stern pushing us along at 8 kts under full reefed sails.
Cary making it happen  in Huge seas wish photo could do the waves jusitic.

Cary making it happen in Huge seas wish photo could do the waves jusitic.


By late mid morning the next day the barometer read 1010MB with 68 nautical miles to go. The wind was now 40 to 50kts with 3 to 5 meters swells pushing us down waves 8 to 15 kts go crew. We were also getting thunderstorms crossing our path. At this point we started heading straight for the coast trying to get in the fetch of land to protect us from the growing waves and wind. We realized we were no longer 10 nautical miles off shore because the coast dipped north in our position, we were 26 miles offshore with a barometer hitting 1008MB meaning we had one hour to get out of the Auglhas current before the wind changed and huge breaking 10 to 15 meter waves started. It would take use three hours to get within 10 miles of shore. As we raced for shore waves began filling the cockpit and breaking over the entire deck of Dragonsbane. At one point I watched been at the Helm disappeared in a breaking wave in a foam of white and blue ocean water. It was Sarahs watch but I took her watch and began to helm the rest of the way back to shore turning down waves and protecting Dragonsbane from broaching.

An hour into my watch a giant hump back whale surface in a swell half a boat length off my Starboard. I was heading for a collision with the whale and new if I hit it head on I would lose the keel because I was surfing down a wave at 12 kts. I just made a choice to turn hard over and aim right for were the whale submerged and hoped for the best. I screamed Whale in hopes to alert the crew down below. As I turn hard over I paralleled the swell which knocked us sideways on our beam submerging the port deck underwater. The hump back whale surfaced right under half the boat on the portside and Dragonsbane rubbed across her side. We felt no impact and I regained heading and continued going.

The closer we came to shore the weaker the swell became and because the barometer read 1005MB we were in the middle of the low pressure. Like a hurricane the middle had no wind so we began to motor but still had 3 meter swell. The swell was moving much faster than us and would break right over the back of the cockpit soaking whoever was on watch. We finally made it to Mossel Bay by 03:00am. WHAT A RIDE!

Thanks,
Jacques

Departed Richards Bay Bound For East London

Well we have been at it for little over a week now battling around the Cape of Good Hope South Africa. Our journey began again from Richards Bay location on the east coast of Africa and sailed to East London 350 nautical miles away. We left the morning of November 8, 2014 in a good looking weather window that hopefully would last 3 days before the wind change to the South West and make the ocean deadly. As we motored out to the Auglhas Current 15 nautical miles offshore we enjoyed the sight of giant hump back whales breaching the ocean and crashing down throwing huge ocean spray into the area. As we continued we had to navigate through the giant anchorage of freighters waiting to head into Richards Bay for cargo, coal and other things.

The wind was very light but was running with us so in order to stay on schedule to arrive in East London I motored sailed for about 12 hours till the wind picked up. About 20 nautical miles south of Durbin the wind picked up to 25 to 30 knots and combined with a 3 knot current we were making average speed of 10kts. We were about 120 miles from East London the barometer began to fall fast down to 1012MB which is a clear sign that the wind would shift at anytime and the ocean would become violent. SO we pushed really hard to get to East London. The following morning we were 10 nautical miles away and the Barometer fell to 1009MB, we were all very happy to make into the harbor just before the wind shift. The passage down was a little intense with lots of marina traffic and large 3 meter waves but we made it safe and sound.

Thanks,
Jacques

Passage Notes Reunion to SA Richards Bay

Working on our position and timeing for crossing the Auglhas Current.

Working on our position and timeing for crossing the Auglhas Current.


I used historical waypoints from Reunion Island to Richards Bay. My way point below Madagascar was 27* 00′ S, 47* 00′ E. I then took a bearing to a way point of my own that worked out perfect for crossing the Agulhas current. It was 28* 29.25′ S, 33* 29.25′ E which should be the beginning of any Agulhas current but we did not experience anything at all. I then continued to WP 28* 44.14′ S, 32* 27.5′ E staying about 1.6 nautical miles north of this rum line just in case the current kicked up. Once again no south bound current effected us right up to this WP. Then I continued to about 28* 44.04′ S, 32* 16.5′ E and turned south and took a bearing straight to the entrance to Richards Bay.

The only area I found a 1 to 2 kts current caused by the Agulhas was right after I cross a shallow shoal which had a depth of 186 feet WP 28* 43.7’S, 32* 18.6E then dropped back to 200+ feet.

Our approach to Richards Bay. We are in the Agulhas Current

Our approach to Richards Bay. We are in the Agulhas Current


As for east to west current it was notice to be more tidal then anything. But reporting positions from the boats around us it seemed that staying south of the rum line by only 1 to 5 nm had a much more fAvorable east bound current and had less negative current. It was also noticed that only a few mile north or south could have a big change in current speed and direction. I suggest that if you have good wind angle but a negative current try sail a few miles north or south and you should see a change in current.

FYI there is a sunk freighter at the entrance of Richards Bay and you can pass it keeping it on your starboard. There is dark oil leaking out of it that looks like a reef but it’s not.
image The ship has a big oil plume that looks like a reef at the entrance of Richards Bay.

Some great pictures during our crossing.

Ben watching the waves and swell in 30 plus knots. Loving it!

Ben watching the waves and swell in 30 plus knots. Loving it!


Cary manning the helm on watch.

Cary manning the helm on watch.

We Made It! South Africa!

Yup I am in the Bar drinken a beer with the crew!

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