Sailing Around The World

Archive for April, 2013

Off to the Marquesas Islands 3000 Nautical Miles

Tomorrow we will begin our 25 day voyage to the Marquesas Islands which is 3000 nautical miles away. I hope to have good wind and weather. We have provisioned Dragonsbane with food, water and fuel. I am sad to leave the Galapagos Island because there are so many great people and travelers here to talk too. Everybody has a great story and the Island is so safe and the local people are wonderful. I wish I could have let you all see the things I have seen here. I am really starting to understand the world and all who live in it. I only hope that after I make it around the world I continue home. The world is big, dangerous, beautiful, peaceful, and lovable, but to travel through all of it is indescribable.  Be grateful for the life we live in the USA, and the thing we have because the majority of the world tries to duplicate it but falls far short of ever being like the USA. I wish all my family friends the best. As always I will post via SSB radio everyday with my position, emotions, and thoughts. Wish us all Dale, Adam, Dragonsbane, and “The Dude” luck.

Enjoy life and Travel More!

Jacques


Pictures From Galapagos Islands

In our last voyage from Panama to Galapagos this was the 2 fisher men in the middle of the crossing 400 plus miles from land.

In our last voyage from Panama to Galapagos this was the 2 fisher men in the middle of the crossing 400 plus miles from land

Folding sails underway as we sailed

Folding sails underway as we sailed

Taxi ramp where you had to take a water taxi for Sixty cents one way from your boat to the port city. The Taxis are in Yellow.

Taxi ramp where you had to take a water taxi for Sixty cents one way from your boat to the port city. The Taxis are in Yellow.

Boarding from water taxis into the ferry boat.

Boarding from water taxis into the ferry boat.

All the crack in our ferry boat as we traveled from San Cruz Island to Isabella Island. This was a result of the Ecuador Navy pilot boat hitting us before we left. A few people got hurt but we left anyway.

All the crack in our ferry boat as we traveled from San Cruz Island to Isabella Island. This was a result of the Ecuador Navy pilot boat hitting us before we left. A few people got hurt but we left anyway.

On our way to Isabella Island on the same Ferry with lots of cracks in the front hull.

On our way to Isabella Island on the same Ferry with lots of cracks in the front hull.

Picture of a Pink Flamingo  in the Flamingo Lagoon

Picture of a Pink Flamingo in the Flamingo Lagoon

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Really big tortoise , saw lots of these guys

Really big tortoise , saw lots of these guys

Iguana on San Curz Island. this one of last few of this kind left

Iguana on San Curz Island. this one of last few of this kind left

This sea lion had no free as most animals here don't free man.

This sea lion had no free as most animals here don’t free man.

A few local fishermen cleaning and selling fish. The Sea Lions and Pelicans are taking table scraps

A few local fishermen cleaning and selling fish. The Sea Lions and Pelicans are taking table scraps

The blue foot Boobies! I love boobies!

The blue foot Boobies! I love boobies!

The Sea lions sleeping on the boats! Oops

The Sea lions sleeping on the boats! Oops

The swimming Iguana's

The swimming Iguana’s

I circled the wiring in our hotel room for our hot water in the shower. Every tiem I touched the shower head  I got shocked! I realize now why South Americans are so short!

I circled the wiring in our hotel room for our hot water in the shower. Every tiem I touched the shower head I got shocked! I realize now why South Americans are so short!

We rode in this little truck with a homemade benches bolted to the frame.

We rode in this little truck with a homemade benches bolted to the frame.

Horses on the trial to the Volcano. We hiked up the 10 mile round trip.

Horses on the trial to the Volcano. We hiked up the 10 mile round trip.

Looking out over  Isabella Island, Galapagos

Looking out over Isabella Island, Galapagos

Dale and Adam walking i the lava fields

Dale and Adam walking i the lava fields

Lava rock

Lava rock

Walking through the Volcano

Walking through the Volcano

Volcano

Volcano

Lava Fields

Lava Fields

great view of Isabella Island, Galapagos

great view of Isabella Island, Galapagos

The Volcano on Isabella Island, Galapagos

The Volcano on Isabella Island, Galapagos

Adam and Dale walking in the lava fields

Adam and Dale walking in the lava fields

Looking out in to ocean from the top of the live volcano

Looking out in to ocean from the top of the live volcano

Standing next to the creator of the last volcano eruption in 2005

Standing next to the creator of the last volcano eruption in 2005

 

We will be heading out to the Marquis Islands on Sunday 4/29/13. It is 3000 miles west of the Galapagos Islands. It hopefully will take less then 25 days. It should be good sailing and fishing, but we will see.

 

Take it easy!

 

Jacques


Diving With Sharks Galapagos Island Gordon Rock 4/23/12

So far this was one of the most challenging dives I have completed. I was told that there were strong currents and that the experience was a must. So having 12 dives under my belt I jumped in full ass! We started our adventure at 6am, we were picked up by the dive boat off Dragonsbane and found out it was only me, Adam, and a nice guy named Bob from Canada who had 389 dives. As we zipped along the coast of San Cruz Island for about 45 minutes to Gordon Rock dive site, we were thrown forward and the engines stalled out! We hit a Manta Ray that was 20 feet long and it stopped us cold. Our dive master and us were very sad to have hit such a beautiful ray. I felt so bad because I felt like I just added to the problem of negative human interaction that you hear about in Galapagos. The dive master said it will more then likely die of its wounds.

After a sad start we made it to the site and geared up all at once. We sat on the gun whale of dive boat together and the dive master counted 3, 2, 1, we all dropped in at once. The current is so strong there that it will sweep you away if you took time jumping in one at a time. We circled up and were given the signal to dive. Submerging to 35 feet we saw a hammerhead shark right below circling. Then, the current took us for a slow ride but pulled us down to about 65 feet. We saw Eagle Rays, turtles, millions of little fish, and a school of Wahoo that had to be in the thousands as we swam through them. After 40 minutes of diving we surfaced and had the challenge of getting back into the dive boat that was going up and down in 4 foot swells and surf.

On our second dive we went to where the current really ripped hard. We all splashed in and went down quick to a rock wall where the current was pulling on you hard enough that you had to hold onto the rock. We dove for about 20 minutes but didn’t see too much and then we got to an underwater gap between two rock formations which made up Gordon Rock. The gap we passed through was about 18 feet wide and 45 feet deep as we held on to the rock bottom. As we crawled across the rock bottom and looked over a big rock bolter there was a school of 9 white tipped reef sharks 8 or 9 feet long swimming in circles 2 feet in front of us. I held onto to the top of the rock boulder as hard as I could. The current was so strong that it blew past as if my whole body was out the side of a car window going down the highway at 60 mph. The hoses from my scuba tank chattered like a flag in the wind. Then it stopped. changed direction 180 degrees and was now was pushing me into the school of sharks that where only inches from my face now. This went on for about 10 minutes. Next, the dive master Hugo, who was giving Adam his secondary air due to Adam running low on his own air tank, let go of the rock wall and shot right through the sharks. The sharks closed right around behind them and now it was my turn. I took a big breath waited for the current to spit me out through the sharks and out the gap. I let go and made it 15 feet but 1 foot short of the next wall. The current dragged me across the rock a few feet but I was able to get a grip and hold on. The second current pushed me out and I was low on air. I could not believe how fast I spent my air gong through those currents. It was a great time and I can’t wait to go again.

Doing Things Whole Assed Works Out Better Than Doing Them Half Assed! Jacques


Busy In The Galapagos Islands

But first I would like to share a few pictures with you. If you have read the last 10 days of voyage post you should understand the frozen moments of time via photos below. Enjoy!

Jacques

 

The Fishermen 400 plus miles off shore in a little boat trying to self me a fish. Crazy SOB's!

The Fishermen 400 plus miles off shore in a little boat trying to self me a fish. Crazy SOB’s!

Adam Cooking

Adam Cooking

Just crossed the Equator!

Just crossed the Equator!

Picture of us as we crossed the Equator with a shot of RUM! I almost made it behind the helm before the camera went off!

Picture of us as we crossed the Equator with a shot of RUM! I almost made it behind the helm before the camera went off!

Our view off the back of Dragonsbane First day Of Landfall Galapagos Islands

Our view off the back of Dragonsbane First day Of Landfall Galapagos Islands


Day 10 We made Landfall Galapagos Island 4/20/3

We made landfall at 3:30pm and spent an hour anchoring in a very small anchorage but managed to fit Dragonsbane. We went to shore on San Cruz Island in Academy Bay, Galapagos Islands. The town here is very clean and the local people are very helpful. I enjoyed Tacos for $5 dollars and was stuffed. The little town was full of shops and restaurants. I am looking forward to going scuba diving and take a few tours of the islands. For now I am going to crawl into my beer and rest for the night.

CHEERS!

Jacques


Day 9 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/19/13

Today was much like yesterday but last evening after I had sent my blog I caught a Tuna. It was a nice little tuna that I filleted up and put on ice for Sushi. For lunch I cooked up some sushi rice, and made my first sushi roll by hand. Ended up making 5 rolls and had some plain raw tuna as well. I can’t believe how good fresh tuna taste right out of the ocean. We all ate it up and can’t wait to catch more. So my fishing efforts have doubled and I used a squid that land on deck from last night. But like before I have not caught anything today but hopefully tomorrow morning.

We are only 100 miles from Galapagos Islands but the wind has died down to 5 knots and we are now moving at 1.2 knots. I think we will burn the fuel to motor the rest of the way. Another exciting fact is that we are only 2 miles north of the equator. I hope I get to see the poles marking the equator, haha just kidding. Anyway I am looking forward to making landfall but I hope we make it before the sun goes down or we will have to stay out in the ocean one more day.

Drink A Beer For Me Tonight!

Jacques


Day 8 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/18/13

I am starting to wonder what it will be like to walk on land after being on Dragonsbane for 8 days and hopefully only two more. I checked our distance remaining and we have 180 nautical miles until we get to the Galapagos Islands. When we land the fun really begins because all the locals speak only Spanish and we have to clear into the country of Ecuador. I read a interesting article from noonsite that a friend of the Family Don sent us of a recent cruiser that stopped in Galapagos Island April 4, 2013. They indicated that on San Cristobel Island the sea lions would board your sailboat if you have a sugar scope or landing at the stern of your boat. Well guess what we have a sugar scope and they said that it’s had to keep them off your boat. Great just what I need is Dragonsbane covered not only in seagull poop but, sea lion nasty poop too. I am also not sure how one gets a sea lion off your boat. I guess I will use pots and pans like I did in Boundary Waters to get the bears out of our tents. Right now I am already being followed by strange animals. Adam calls them UFF’s aka Unidentified Flying Foul which have been with us for the last few days and nights. I guess they also like company on a long journey across this dessert of water.

As we continue to sail my dad and Adam seem to be getting impatient for the soon to be landfall. They are ready to be off Dragonsbane and knee deep into Rum & Coke, but I am slowly enjoying the distance from everything. I feel so relaxed and stress free because no matter what no one can find me out here. The land problems of today don’t affect me and the idea that no matter how hard I sail Dragonsbane I will not go any faster then 7 knots. So I must sit back and enjoy the ride, read all the books I have put off my whole life, and think about all the important thing in my life. SON OF!!! I just burnt the brownies in this stupid oven! The dam thing is ether 450 degrees or colder then the air temp. Got to Go!

Remember to Always Check Your Brownies in the Oven!

Jacques


Day 7 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/17/13

Today was another exciting day of sailing with wind in the 10 to 20 knot range. We all spent most of the day doing house keeping thing on Dragonsbane. Washing cloths by hand and watching some of the cloths get blown off the life. I guess I won’t have to do so much laundry next time. Adam made spaghetti with red sauce but never put any SPAM into the sauce which made me sad. It was at least fun to watch a person without his sea legs make a meal well Dragonsbane jumping all over at a 20 degree slant for the first time. He is learning that when you set something down it fly’s across the cabin and that more of the lands on the floor then in the pot. He found this out last night when he set his coffee mug in what he thought was a secure location. As Dragonsbane jump across waves his mug jumped up, then shifted to the right, then down, and back up. I watched his mug go up, over, and then down on the floor and coffee everywhere. He gave up on coffee and went on watch pissed off enough to keep him up for 4 hours. An hour or two before his watch my dad was sleeping in the forward cabin and I hit a big wave that came over the top deck. My dad had not closed his hatch all the way and was waken up with a shower of cold salt water. He had fun cleaning that up today. But don’t think I am left out in all the fun of my two comrades I too have hit my head so many time from Dragonsbane shifting quickly and I have lots of cuts in my shins from kicking winches in the cockpit. My bed has been soaked at least 3 times sense we have left Panama. Yes the fun is just beginning and we are all in good spirits.

Keep trying, you will get there someday!

Jacques


Day 6 Passage to Galapagos Island 4-16-13

Today we finally had 10 plus knots of wind and knocked our distance down to 356 nautical miles. The weather was overcast but warm. We have not seen anything or anybody until about noon today when we were about 400 nautical miles from the closest part of land. We saw a boat that was only 20 feet long and had two of the craziest men I have ever seen. They had missing teeth and where sun backed dark brown almost black and covered in fish guts. They motored up next to us and asked if we would like some fish to buy or at least that’s what I thought they said in Spanish. I said no thanks, but I wish I had because I suck at fishing in the wide open ocean, yes I will admit that I have only caught 4 fish sense Panama. Anyway these two guys where in a 20 foot bass boat more or less and were riding the swells like it was a walk in the park, no VHF radio, no Radar, no running light, and no life raft. Just two guys sitting in boat fishing in the middle of the ocean. My hat is off to them because that is ether one of the stupidest thing I have ever seen or the bravest. God be with them!

Tonight Adam made at lovely meal of meatballs and rice with a cream of mushroom. It all tasted good and now he can cook supper too. The night has now approached and the wind is kicking up to 20 knots so I will have to end this blog and go reef the sails soon if it gets any worse.

Just remember even in the middle of an ocean you can be surprised by other humans! Our world has no boundaries anymore; they only do when you say I can’t!

Take care everybody, Night!

Jacques


Day 5 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/15/13

We have not seen a ship for two days now and we have not seen land for almost five days. We are very close to being halfway with 446 nautical miles to go. The sailing has been very slow, but interesting way out here in the middle of this liquid dessert. All around you can see the horizon that looks like it just falls off into nothingness. The water is a dark blue that changes from bright blue close up to almost dark black as your eyes look out into the open. Its strange not even to hear a jet flying overhead or a engine rumbling off in the distance. When everybody goes to sleep and I am on watch I can hear Dragonsbane slowly cutting its way through the ocean and the only thing that keeps me company is the compass and wind instrument as I study how the boat is moving along the 5 knot breeze. The sounds of water slapping the haul and the sails sheets being stretched as the wind fills them is the only sound left to hear. Every once in awhile I hear the faint sound of somebody below deck sounding off with a fart which makes me laugh, and I think it is to quiet out here. Then as I begin to think of friends and girls I wish I was home to say hi, but I get side track by some object flying right next to me in the cockpit. My heart speeds up and I can see just a bright green glowing light that follows me. Then it just shot straight ahead of the boat and is gone. I wonder if I am losing it, but then it is right back again and I think of hitting it with something. Then it gets so close to me and I hear a loud squawk and it is a bird, stupid bird thought you were some UFO or something. I settle back down and think of home again until something else happens.

Loving Life, but Missing you All!

Jacques


Day 4 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/14/13

We have found the wind for now and enjoyed 20 knots of wind for the last 14 hours and I hope it keeps up, but as I am writing the wind is dropping off. As for the rest of the day it was very eventful! To start we were sailing into a big squall and the wind was rising up to 24 knots so my dad and Adam started the task of reefing in the sail. I was trying to sleep but my bunk is right below the wench they where using. I may as well have stuck my head in a engine compartment because the winch is loud. So not being able to sleep I crawled out of my bunk and stood in the companion way and watch them work. Adam was at the helm and my dad was working at the wench trying crank in the sail. The wind kept changing so Adam was struggling with keep the sail full of wind. I was impressed by there team effort and decided not to get involved because our cockpit does not have the room for us all to complete the above task. As soon as my dad finished cranking in the sail the winch hand popped out of the drum and went over board, he tried to grab it but only lost his hate too. My dad was very pissed about losing his favorite winch handle and hat, I thought he was going to jump in for them but the wind changed so they had to tack the sail again instead. This time my dad took the helm and Adam began cranking in the sail. As they worked I tried saying thing like “Shit Happens” to improve there mood. As soon as Adam finished cranking the sail in he let his hand off the second best winch and it went right into the ocean and sank. Adam said SHIT HAPPENS!)@&(*&@ yeah right! So now we are out 2 good wench handles and still need to reef in the main so I get my gear on and start dropping the main sail. I get our old heavy iron wench handles out that look like something from the mid evil days and try to crank in the mainsail reef line but the winch is jammed. So I tap the button to engage the electric motor but the winch hand spins really fast and punches me right in the face but misses my front teeth. After a short string of profanity I finished reefing the main with a nice swollen face. Now the there is lots of rain and the inside of my cabin/bunk is wet with rain water, so now I have a water bed too. We are all wet in one way or another and the boat interior has some water in it as well. But the good news is we only have 498 nautical miles to go at 3 knots per hour. O yeah and I fixed the ripped sail too.

Enjoy Life Now because SHIT HAPPENS!

Jacques
current location: 4deg 8.4min north, 82deg 7min west


Day 3 Passage to Galapagos Island 4/13/13

Last night around 8pm we finally turned off the engine and started sailing. From 8 pm to about noon today we sailed about 70 miles. The wind is blowing from 3 to 9 knots but we are able to average 3 knots. The going is slow but we are going in the right direction. I figure it will know take us 10 days more to get to the Galapagos Islands. I fished all day and only caught a Jelly Fish, so I made fried rice and brownies.

This evening we ripped our light wind drifter jib which I am sad about and now have to repair. The good news is that as soon as we took down the ripped drifter and put up our heavy jib a big Thunder Storm approached us. It is a slow moving squall and is bowing about 10 to 14 knots of wind. Its very dark now and the lightening is so intense that I thought about putting my sunglasses on. We are all a little worried about the lightening hitting our 52 foot mast because we are the tallest point in the Pacific ocean for about 200 miles now. I fell like I am running around in a field with a metal rode in my hand! I do love the show it is putting on and love the thrill of the stress that comes with this storm. I will not lie, once again I have white knuckles on the helm and a big smile watching the ocean light up like 4th July.

Current location: 5deg 1.73min North, 82deg 8.76min West

Enjoy your evening,

Jacques


Day 2 Passage to Galapagos Island 4-12-13

Need a little wind here! As predicted we have not seen more then 5 knots of wind all day. As far as the eye can see is nothing but ocean polished glass. It is so perfectly smooth it reflects the few clouds in the sky, so you get dizzy looking at the two spaces of heaven and earth. We tried to sail a bit but the wind speed was only 3 knots and Dragonsbane with full sail only crawled forward at 1.2 knots. I tried fishing and caught nothing today but all around use is fish jumping in schools of thousands. The schools of fish are so big that it makes ripples on the flat surface of ocean which make me think there is wind approaching, but nothing. Adam made a great observation about the fish and said it was like looking out on a prairie and seeing all the Prairie Dogs popping there heads up. We also motored through a group of 50 or more Dolphins that were jumping and playing. The rest of our day included reading books and wondering if we should turn more south or keep heading in a south west direction straight for the Galapagos Islands. The decision is very difficult to make because we only have about 3 days of fuel left, which will leave us 200 nautical miles short of the Galapagos Islands which we must sail. If we head south we have a better chance at finding wind but we will add mileage to our trip. But a good note is we have lots of water, food, and we can be out at sea for many weeks, I just don’t want to! So if you can send us some wind!

Current Location: 6 degrees 1.44 mins North, 81 degrees 10.43mins West

Take it Easy!

Jacques


Day 1 Golapagos Island Passage

Well after spending a few weeks in Panama we have left it behind us only to find a very calm sea. We reviewed the forecasted wind and location and hope that the reports are right. Our plan is to motor about 300 nautical miles south west were there is a belt of east trade winds that blows about 10 to 18 knots. If we can manage to make 3 to knots we should make Galapagos Island in 8 days. But right now the waves out here in the Pacific is coming from Dragonsbane. It really is interesting to see the ocean surface like glass as far as you can look. But seeing such a flat surface you can see a ocean of plastic bags, Styrofoam cups, and other odd trash floating along. I can see the big peace’s of trash because the sea birds are standing on it and taking a brake from flying. I also have seen lots of schools of fish and I have caught 3 tuna so far but they are very small. With no wind it is very hot out here and so we are all melting into our seats and reading books. I hope for wind and look forward to sailing.

Thanks,

Jacques


THE DINGHY SANK!

Once again we tried our best to get under way but Panama had better plans for us today. To begin Adam and I went to shore after filling our diesel tanks up from the fuel cans we carry onboard. As we arrived we were informed that we had to pay $28 dollars for the use of the dingy dock. So we paid and spent the next hour filling up our 12 gallons of fuel. Only issue is that the fuel spout was bigger then the hole in our fuel cans so it took a long time to fill them. Next we ventured back unloaded the fuel and had lunch. I then spent a few hours plotting out our course to the Galapagos and finished a few other little tasks. We then decided that our Gasoline cans need to be topped off, but the gasoline is sold in a different place then the Diesel fuel. So being the smart crew that we are we decided to land our dinghy along a rock break wall that was right next to the gas station so we didn’t have to carry the two cans a ½ mile by hand. The landing went great, but when I got to the gas station they where just filling up the fuel tanks so I had to wait an hour before I could get my 10 gallons. My dad not knowing what was taking me so long dropped Adam off to see if I need help, nope I said this is PANAMA I am waiting! After fueling up we waved for my dad to come pick us up. As he approached the break wall the ocean swell lifted up the dinghy and then dropped the front end on a sharp rock and popped it. As we raced back to the boat I had my hand over the 4 inch  hole trying to contain as much air in the dingy as we sank into the ocean. We made it just in time to unload the fuel, outboard motor, and other items. Now we have a dinghy with a 4 inch whole, a pound of glue, patch material and a hard lesson on why you never to take your rubber dinghy to a rock break wall.

Thanks,

Jacques


THIS IS PANAMA?

You know,  I left for a trip around the world thinking to myself  of all the wonderful places I will see, and the adventures I will experience. I never gave any thought to the overwhelming difficulty with language barriers and finding simple repair parts. For example our autopilot has not worked sense we left Annapolis Maryland five long months and 5000 miles ago. Three weeks ago we identified the issue and had to replace a part from the USA. I ordered it right away and it arrived in Panama a few days ago. Being used to UPS service in the USA I thought the part would be easy to get and we would be saved, NOPE! I found a very interesting phase “ THIS IS PANAMA!” Which means anything goes, I drank beers in cars, watched police walk around with M16 guns, motorcycles that drive everywhere but on the road legally, and that the UPS carrier doesn’t know there head from there asshole! To make a very long story short I finally received the package that was only 1.18 lbs after driving from one end of Panama City to the other over the course of 2 days $100 less money in my pocket “note the part is only $60  bucks”. The good news is that I improved on my Spanish and if anybody would like to play a game of charades I will kick your butt! The good news is that we have fixed the autopilot, but the bad news is that my new air compressor for filling scuba tanks arrived with a broken valve and now I have a 100 pound paper weight. So I will wait 1 month to get that part so I can fill my scuba tanks, o well at least the sun came up today! I guess its back to skin diving to wash the bottom of Dragonsbane. I tried that today but the Jellyfish stung a little to much so I gave up and will try another day. But at least I have a Cuba Libre Ron & Cola to wash down the stress and cool off in the hot sun.

 

Yup, taste just as good as you think it does!

Yup, taste just as good as you think it does!

Cheers! Enjoy life you only get one!

 

Jacques


Finally Through the Panama Canal & Now Off to Galapagos Island

The last two days have been very busy and I am glad to share a few photos of our transit through the Gatun Locks to the Pacific Ocean where we will prepare for our passage to the Galapagos Islands. The passage will take 9 days if we can keep our speed of 6 knots. This should be interesting because it will be my friend Adam first time out at sea. It will also be the longest time I have been at sea and I am hoping  it will be as wonderful as people say. I have been watching the wind reports and it sounds like we should have 10 to 15 knots all the way to the Galapagos and I am hoping for 20 to 25 because we will not make good distance at 10 to 15 knots, so wish us good luck. My mom will be flying out of Panama tomorrow and will rejoin us sometime later on.

We put tires and bummers on both side of Dragonsbane to protect her from the lock walls, Tug boats, and Pilot boats.

We put tires and bummers on both side of Dragonsbane to protect her from the lock walls, Tug boats, and Pilot boats.

We had to raft with 2 other boats before we went through the locks.

We had to raft with 2 other boats before we went through the locks.

DSCF1856

 

The Panama Canal Line handlers tossing there lines to us so we could tie our heavy rope lines to them. They would drag in  our rope lines and tie us off to the canal walls.

The Panama Canal Line handlers tossing there lines to us so we could tie our heavy rope lines to them. They would drag in our rope lines and tie us off to the canal walls.

The target is for the line handlers that walk the walls of the Canal. They practice throwing there monkey balls at the target and over the top pole.

The target is for the line handlers that walk the walls of the Canal. They practice throwing there monkey balls at the target and over the top pole.

The water rushing into the locks to raise us up to the next lock of 3

The water rushing into the locks to raise us up to the next lock of 3

The lock has finished filling and I am now 50 feet higher looking out over the Caribbean  Sea

The lock has finished filling and I am now 50 feet higher looking out over the Caribbean Sea

 

 

After we went through the first 3 locks we spent the night on the fresh water lake. We awoke at 6:30am and motored 5 hours to the Pacific locks on the lake. We then went through 3 more locks and dropped 150 feet to Pacific sea level.

After we went through the first 3 locks we spent the night on the fresh water lake and tired to a mooring ball for a freighter, enough room for two sailboats. We awoke at 6:30am and motored 5 hours to the Pacific locks on the lake. We then went through 3 more locks and dropped 150 feet to Pacific sea level.

Jacques and Adam talking about something important as we motored through the lake !

Jacques and Adam talking about something important as we motored through the lake !

 

 

One of the load ships on the lake between the two locks of the Pacific and Caribbean Sea

One of the load ships on the lake between the two locks of the Pacific and Caribbean Sea

Tug pushing a Freighter throw the Lake

Tug pushing a Freighter throw the Lake

After we finished our Transit a dingy tender came along side Dragonsbane and took all our tires and ropes for $10.

After we finished our Transit a dingy tender came along side Dragonsbane and took all our tires and ropes for $10.

Thanks,

Jacques

 

 

 

 


In The Pacific

We made it through the Panama Canal and we are now anchored right off of Panama City. We enjoyed some beers and when I get the internet issue worked out I will post some pictures. But for now I am working on my beer!

Thanks,

Jacques


Transiting the Panama Canal Tomorrow so Watch

Tomorrow we are scheduled to Transit the Panama Canal in the Gatun Locks  at 3:30pm 4/5/13. If you check the Camera link: http://www.pancanal.com/eng/photo/camera-java.html you will see Dragonsbane hopefully if the Schedule is not changed. We will then spend the night in the fresh water Gatun lake between the Caribbean  Sea locks and Pacific locks. We will then motor 5 hours to the next lock and hopefully pass through the last three locks at around 12:30pm 4/6/13. I will fly our Dragonsbane Flag so it will make us stand out more. Hope you see us all, look for the blue sailboat. Also my friend Adam will be joining us tongiht and hopefully for the next year or so of the trip.

Our Panama Canal Transit Number

Our Panama Canal Transit Number

Our Colors for Dragonsbane AKA: our Flag

Our Colors for Dragonsbane AKA: our Flag

Thanks,

Jacques