Sailing Around The World

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Day 14 Passage to BVI “Ship”

At 00:02 hours we made contact with a west bound ship traveling at 15kts that was overtaking us. I was awaken by Cary to point this fact out to me. I haled the ship VHF 16 indicated on our AIS as “AURORA BULKER” listed as a cargo ship, destination SOuth America. I did make contact via VHF but the night watch could not speak English. We were on a collision course and by this time I could see the bridge windows and noticed that the bridge lights were on, on the inside of the viewing deck for night watch. Its a well known fact that you cant see out a window at night when you have your bright lights on inside. So sense the ship would not deviate its course I decided to drop sail and turn the motor on and run in a perpendicular direction. I based this decision on the fact that both the white, red, and and now the green running lights were both coming into view meaning that the ship was coming right at us. No sooner did I do this when the ship passed right off our stern by 5 boat length or so. I used the Chart plotter to find our distance. I can not believe in the middle of the south Atlantic ocean we almost got run over by a commercial ship because they did not give a rip about what was around them. Sometimes I hate stupid people. But all is well on board.

Current Position: 19:25utc, 14deg 31.2min S, 11deg 3.3min W, SOG 7.6kts, COG 343deg-M, WS 12kts

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 13 Atlantic Passage “It all Falls Apart”

Well it has been a interesting few days to say least. So far we have not seen another ship, boat, or anything for 6 days. It has been overcast which makes energy a bit tricky but we survive. So far I have had to repair the spinnaker pole by drilling, re-taping screws and re-installing the female socket end after it got ripped out in a squall. Repaired the snap shackle for the head stay after a squall stretched the steel clasp apart. like always I had to repair three sheet after the spinnaker pole cat paw ate them after running for 48 hours each. But the real ball buster was that our 9 KG tank LP propane connected to the solenoid leaked out our LP gas Now we have one 5 KG tank for the next 30 days. I guess coffee is out! I find it funny because the LP solenoid is supposed to stop leak not make them what a POS!!!!!!! FIXED NOW!

But on a high note we are under 4000 nautical miles to go. Hope I can keep this machine running till we get to the BVI lol!

Living out in the blue dessert,

Jacques & Cary

FYI SSB radio station transmition are very hard to get and so few blogs will be seen, just getting weather gribs is a full time job.

Current Postion: 18:58UTC, 15deg 58.8min S, 09deg 01.0min W, SOG 6.8kts, COG 330deg-M, ws 15kts, swell <1M, 1017MB, DR3,946NM


Day 11 Keeping It Together

The weather has been steady blowing out of the south east at 10 to 15 knots. We have been switching between a spinnaker and double head sail combo. I have been keeping real busy with repairs due to chaffing of sheets and spinnaker rips. So far I have had to sew 5 panels back together because the stitching just let go. I have had 4 sheets chaff right through during the night. Really good news is that we crossed over into the western hemisphere, glad to be back!

Current position: 19:21utc 19deg 32.7min S, 05deg 27.7min W, COG 318deg-m, SOG 7kts, WS 12kts, Swell <1m, DR4177NM, 1019MB

Thank You,

Jacques & Cary


Day 8 “Making Way”

Survived another birthday at sea and looking for to dry land someday. For now we are making our shifts and feel like we can go forever. The weather is nice but a bit overcast. Made about 7 sail changes/configurations and now running with the spinnaker. All is well on board. Should be passing St. Helena in 7 days.

Current Position: 08:48utc, 23deg 7.5min S, 2deg 36.7min E, COG 319deg-m, SOG 6.5kts, WS 14kts, Swell <1m , Cloudy, 1017MB, DR4744nm


Day 4 Passage to BVI “Steady”

The wind and waves are beginning to steady and hold at a 20 to 25 knot average and the swells match the wind speed. We are making good speed at 7 kts and only had to make one sail change today.

CUrrent Position: UTC18:18, 28deg 45.1min S, 10deg 03.0min E, SOG 7.1kts, COG 326deg, WS 20 to 25kts, swell <2 meters, 1021MB, Cloudy overcast

Thanks,

Jacques & Cary


Day 3 “Relief”

It was a wet evening taking in the odd white capped wave into the cockpit every hour. BUt at last around mid morning the wind dropped down to the mid 20kts and sometime we see high teen wind speed. The good news is that at the winds current angle we are making a easy 7.5kts average, so we are ripping off the mileage now. All is well.

Thanks,

Jacques

Current Position: UTC 18:19, 30deg 21.1min S, 12deg 29.5min E, SOG 7.8kts, COG 322deg-M, 1018MB, WS 20 to 25kts, Swell <2meters, Clear skies


Day 2 Passage to BVI WINDY

We are making good speed but have had really strong winds and big waves tossing us around. I hope by tomorrow we will be out of the westerly band that shadows South Africa. Did have some fun last evening when our freezer control thermostat broke because a few drops of salt water shorted it out. I spent the evening and morning rebuilding it with old parts and we seem to be back in business. Rocken and Rolling Jacques and Cary

Current Position: UTC 18:67, 32deg 0.5min S, 15deg 8.4min E, COG 327deg-M, SOG 7.1kts, WS 25 to 35kts gusting to 40kts, Swell 2 to 6 meters, 1015MB


Cape Town To The Caribbean 50 Days At Sea

The Sailing Route for the next 50 days

The Sailing Route for the next 50 days

To let you all know my friends/crew Jade, Ben, and Sarah have departed Dragopnsbane to do some land traveling in Africa and I wish them best of luck. As for Cary and I we are on the eve of our last major passage that will take us from Cape Town South Africa to the Caribbean BVI Tortola Island over the course of 50 days. We will sail a total of 5,990 nautical miles short handed. We will run on four hour shifts, 4 on 4 off and work together in situations that require two people. This will be a fun challenge and will also complete my world circumnavigation of 2.5 years. I am glad to have my good friend Cary on baord to help stay the course. So that said I will post updates on our passage as often as I can but I will not have the energy to do daily post but I will try.

Thank you,

Jacques & Cary


East London to Mossel Bay South Africa Passage “STORMS, WHALES, 50KTS WINDS, WAVES”

Thunderstorm at night 45kts wind and 4 meter swell plus

Thunderstorm at night 45kts wind and 4 meter swell plus


Based on our experience from our last passage out in the Auglhas current, swell, and weather we decided to go for it in the next available weather window. The weather looked good for a 48 hour period. We could complete the next 320 nautical mile passage in that window but it would be close. The weather began with 25kts on our backs with 2 meter waves. The barometer read 1017MB and rising, good news. We made quick work of the first 120 nautical miles passing Port Elizabeth 15 nautical miles off our Starboard and barometer read 1022MB. By mid afternoon when I came on watch the barometer had fell to 1018MB in only a few hours. The wind was now a constant 35kts right on our stern pushing us along at 8 kts under full reefed sails.
Cary making it happen  in Huge seas wish photo could do the waves jusitic.

Cary making it happen in Huge seas wish photo could do the waves jusitic.


By late mid morning the next day the barometer read 1010MB with 68 nautical miles to go. The wind was now 40 to 50kts with 3 to 5 meters swells pushing us down waves 8 to 15 kts go crew. We were also getting thunderstorms crossing our path. At this point we started heading straight for the coast trying to get in the fetch of land to protect us from the growing waves and wind. We realized we were no longer 10 nautical miles off shore because the coast dipped north in our position, we were 26 miles offshore with a barometer hitting 1008MB meaning we had one hour to get out of the Auglhas current before the wind changed and huge breaking 10 to 15 meter waves started. It would take use three hours to get within 10 miles of shore. As we raced for shore waves began filling the cockpit and breaking over the entire deck of Dragonsbane. At one point I watched been at the Helm disappeared in a breaking wave in a foam of white and blue ocean water. It was Sarahs watch but I took her watch and began to helm the rest of the way back to shore turning down waves and protecting Dragonsbane from broaching.

An hour into my watch a giant hump back whale surface in a swell half a boat length off my Starboard. I was heading for a collision with the whale and new if I hit it head on I would lose the keel because I was surfing down a wave at 12 kts. I just made a choice to turn hard over and aim right for were the whale submerged and hoped for the best. I screamed Whale in hopes to alert the crew down below. As I turn hard over I paralleled the swell which knocked us sideways on our beam submerging the port deck underwater. The hump back whale surfaced right under half the boat on the portside and Dragonsbane rubbed across her side. We felt no impact and I regained heading and continued going.

The closer we came to shore the weaker the swell became and because the barometer read 1005MB we were in the middle of the low pressure. Like a hurricane the middle had no wind so we began to motor but still had 3 meter swell. The swell was moving much faster than us and would break right over the back of the cockpit soaking whoever was on watch. We finally made it to Mossel Bay by 03:00am. WHAT A RIDE!

Thanks,
Jacques


Departed Richards Bay Bound For East London

Well we have been at it for little over a week now battling around the Cape of Good Hope South Africa. Our journey began again from Richards Bay location on the east coast of Africa and sailed to East London 350 nautical miles away. We left the morning of November 8, 2014 in a good looking weather window that hopefully would last 3 days before the wind change to the South West and make the ocean deadly. As we motored out to the Auglhas Current 15 nautical miles offshore we enjoyed the sight of giant hump back whales breaching the ocean and crashing down throwing huge ocean spray into the area. As we continued we had to navigate through the giant anchorage of freighters waiting to head into Richards Bay for cargo, coal and other things.

The wind was very light but was running with us so in order to stay on schedule to arrive in East London I motored sailed for about 12 hours till the wind picked up. About 20 nautical miles south of Durbin the wind picked up to 25 to 30 knots and combined with a 3 knot current we were making average speed of 10kts. We were about 120 miles from East London the barometer began to fall fast down to 1012MB which is a clear sign that the wind would shift at anytime and the ocean would become violent. SO we pushed really hard to get to East London. The following morning we were 10 nautical miles away and the Barometer fell to 1009MB, we were all very happy to make into the harbor just before the wind shift. The passage down was a little intense with lots of marina traffic and large 3 meter waves but we made it safe and sound.

Thanks,
Jacques


Passage Notes Reunion to SA Richards Bay

Working on our position and timeing for crossing the Auglhas Current.

Working on our position and timeing for crossing the Auglhas Current.


I used historical waypoints from Reunion Island to Richards Bay. My way point below Madagascar was 27* 00′ S, 47* 00′ E. I then took a bearing to a way point of my own that worked out perfect for crossing the Agulhas current. It was 28* 29.25′ S, 33* 29.25′ E which should be the beginning of any Agulhas current but we did not experience anything at all. I then continued to WP 28* 44.14′ S, 32* 27.5′ E staying about 1.6 nautical miles north of this rum line just in case the current kicked up. Once again no south bound current effected us right up to this WP. Then I continued to about 28* 44.04′ S, 32* 16.5′ E and turned south and took a bearing straight to the entrance to Richards Bay.

The only area I found a 1 to 2 kts current caused by the Agulhas was right after I cross a shallow shoal which had a depth of 186 feet WP 28* 43.7’S, 32* 18.6E then dropped back to 200+ feet.

Our approach to Richards Bay. We are in the Agulhas Current

Our approach to Richards Bay. We are in the Agulhas Current


As for east to west current it was notice to be more tidal then anything. But reporting positions from the boats around us it seemed that staying south of the rum line by only 1 to 5 nm had a much more fAvorable east bound current and had less negative current. It was also noticed that only a few mile north or south could have a big change in current speed and direction. I suggest that if you have good wind angle but a negative current try sail a few miles north or south and you should see a change in current.

FYI there is a sunk freighter at the entrance of Richards Bay and you can pass it keeping it on your starboard. There is dark oil leaking out of it that looks like a reef but it’s not.
image The ship has a big oil plume that looks like a reef at the entrance of Richards Bay.

Some great pictures during our crossing.

Ben watching the waves and swell in 30 plus knots. Loving it!

Ben watching the waves and swell in 30 plus knots. Loving it!


Cary manning the helm on watch.

Cary manning the helm on watch.


We Made It! South Africa!

Yup I am in the Bar drinken a beer with the crew!


Day 9 Paassage to South Africa “Weather”

So I ran the spinnaker for about a hour and decided it was time to take it down when I became confused on which was my wind speed or boat speed. For one hour I average 9 knots and had a heck of a time keeping Dragonsbane under control. Its funny when you run out of wind and put up a big sail on the Indian ocean the wind picks right back up and then you have to reef again. Anyway we are about 295 nautical miles away from Richards Bay and looking at the weather we need to make landfall by Thursday evening. It is going to be a real close call on the weather as a small south western blow comes up the coast to Richards Bay halting any landfall attempts. If we don’t make the window Thursday night we will have to go back out to sea and heavy too for 24 hours. I sure hope we don’t have to do that but if we do we will, safety first. The reason is because the offshore current 3 miles off the coast is way to dangerous to cross in a south westerly blow and can cause 20 meter waves with deep troughs that can be deadly so we will play it safe.

Current Position: 03:30UTC, 28deg 19.6min South, 36deg 03.5min East, SOG 7.4kts, COG 292deg-M, 1021mb, Swell 1 meter, WS 16kts

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 8 Passage to Africa

Well still making way to Africa but the wind is now getting to low to make good progress. I have decided to put up the spinnaker in a effort to make a safe landfall before another low starts up into the Indian. I have a 50 hours to sail the last 300 nautical miles with only 10 knots of wind to do so. So here we go!

Current Position: 11:08UTC, 28deg 08.4’min south, 38deg 00.4min east, 1022mb, ws 10kts ENE, Swell>1meter.

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 7 Passage to Africa “Soaked”

Well still making good progress to Richards Bay and have 450 nautical miles to go. We finally are out of a gale and just coasting along in 20 to 25 knot winds and everybody is feel better now.

Current Position: 28deg 05.3min South, 40deg 17.8min East, COG 286deg M, SOG 6.9kts, 1025MB, Cloudy, 20deg C.

thanks,

Jacques, Jade, Ben, Sarah, Cary


Day 4, 5, 6 ‘Huge Storm/Gale” Passage to South Africa

Yesterday evening at the end of my watch I could see on the horizon a large dark blue could that was low to the water. As we approach this large front I noticed a large gray iron ring projecting out from the dense areas of the approaching storm. I decided based on the movement of our past few storms that the front was moving from north to south. We were approaching from the east heading west into this system that was flashing lots of lightening and you could thunder. I decided to drop sail and reef to a triple mainsail, and hoisted our storm staysail. I then had Jade reach almost due north and slow us down to about 2 knots allowing the bulk of storm to move south so I thought. As the lightening and thunder increased and the front approached closer I decided to tack to the north east allowing us to get more north and away from the approaching storm because I thought I could see the back side of the system. Right after we tacked a rush of ice cold air like entering into a department store from out of the summer heat into AC. The wind was ice cold and then it began to blow. It reached up to 40 knots in less then a minute. Dragonsbane had her rail underwater and the waves began crashing over the deck. Then the rain came in buckets and whited out the air with cracks of thunder and bright lightening. I relieved Jade from the Helm and turn up into the wind pinching as hard as I could but still keeping us moving forward at 3 knots. The spray from the waves was blinding our sight and the wind began to spin 90 degrees to port then to Starboard making it very hard to keep Dragonsbane under control. We continued like this for 1 hour and finally the wind began to lesson down to 30 knots. But the rain, thunder and lightening lasted for 4 more hours. Eventually the wind dead off to 5 knots on the nose and we have been motoring sense. Everybody is doing well and sense we have been motoring we caught another Maha Maha weighting in at 22 pounds.

Day 5 & 6 has been a mix of 20 to 30 knots winds. Current we are in a full on southerly Gale sailing hard at 8 knots full reefed.

FYI it has been very difficult to send blog post via SSB radio so I may miss a few days.
Current Position: UTC 19:10,26-10-14, 27deg 34.8min South, 42deg 53.6min East, SOG 8kts, COG 300deg-M, 1022MB, WS 35kts

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 3 Passage to South Africa “Stormy Night”

At about 22:30 at night the barometer was reading 1017MB and slowly began to fall to 1015MB. This of course occurred much slower then the 35 knot winds that blew in and 2 meter seas. The change in wind conditions and sea state only took ten minutes and was slowly reflected in the barometer over the course of 4 hours which been then we were under just a staysail make way at 6 to 8 knots. To added to our fun the current we have been traveling on from east to west changed to north to south and is pushing us down at 3 knots slowing our west progress down to 4 to 5 knots. The swells are also coming out of the north catching us on the beam and soaking the poor person on watch on a regular bases. But that’s not all folks, throughout the night we were surrounded by thunder head squalls that flashed 360 degrees around us and lit up the sky like cannon fire on the horizon incredibly ever few minutes for hours. It has been a amazing show during the night and now the wind has lesson to 18 knots but the current is still causing us to slip more south, hopefully not for to much longer. Boy I tell you, this is great fun for me at least, I think the crew is enjoying it too.

Current Position: UTC 02:56, 25deg 33.8min South, 49deg 17.9min East, SOG 5.4kts, COG 255deg, WS 19kts, CLoudy, ATM 1014mb

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 2 Passage to South Africa “Strong Current”

So far we have had some great weather with only a few squalls with lightening. But the most exciting thing so far is that we are riding in a current that is moving between 1 to 2 knots. The weather outlook is looking good for the next two days but then the wind drops off to 10kts or less. Hopefully the wind will fill back in shortly.

Current Position: 00:26utc, 23deg 59.1min South, 51deg 15.9min East, SOG 8.7kts, COG 248deg-M, Swell<1meter, WS 15kts, Current 2 kts,Partly Cloudy,

Thanks

Jacques


Day 1 Passage to South Africa “The Tough One”

We left Reunion Island yesterday morning at 8:00am for Richards Bay, South Africa East Coast. The passage is roughly 1400 nautical miles long and should take 11 days or less hopefully. Based on historical sailing records the area we are about to enter is the most challenging ocean regions to cross for sailors. The area between Madagascar and the Cape of Good Hope is dominated by Antarctic low pressure systems that move eastward and form large gale winds. From these systems that can cover hundreds of miles they also produce random waves which reach heights of 20 meters with deep long troughs. Once the bulk of our passage is complete we then have to time our passage across the Agulhas current which runs from the north to south along the east African coast. The timing of our crossing must be done during a favorable wind direction of north east and should never be attempted during a south westerly. If caught in a wind change situation during a crossing we will have to turn around head back out to the ocean. It has been record that within one our of a south westerly wind change the 3 to 6 knot Agulhas current will build 65 foot breaking swell and will become very hazardous. We should be able to avoid such a situation by monitoring the barometer. Currently we are looking at a good weather window to cross the above areas and hopefully all will go well. There are 3 other sailboats that left at the same time as us. Looking forward to the challenges ahead of us and it should be a good time.

Current Position: 22deg 14.3min South, 53deg 33.5min East, COG 251deg-M, SOG 5.8kts, BP 1016mb, Sweel<1 meter, WS 12kts NE, Sunny

Thank You,

Jacques


The French Secret, Reunion Island

Arriving into Reunion Island I new from my charts that the mountains rose out of the sea to 10,000 feet at its highest point. I had no idea that the center of this mountain range could be to amazing. The 5 of us hiked for three days through the heart of the Reunion Island volcanic range and I was blown away. The topographical landscape is just breathtaking and I hope you enjoy the photos. If you click on the photos they enlarge.

Tomorrow we sail to South Africa.

After leaving Mauritius Island the sun tried to set the ocean on fire.

After leaving Mauritius Island the sun tried to set the ocean on fire.

The sun rises agian on the morning we could see Reunion Island come into sight.

The sun rises agian on the morning we could see Reunion Island come into sight.

Its great to see the Sunrise in the morning .

Its great to see the Sunrise in the morning .

There sh,e is Reunion Island soaked in rain.

There sh,e is Reunion Island soaked in rain.

Still a bit rolly as we round the bottom of Reunion Island.

Still a bit rolly as we round the bottom of Reunion Island.

So as soon as we arrived started our hike on the GR-R2 hiking trail through the Mountains called the Cirque De Mafate.

So as soon as we arrived started our hike on the GR-R2 hiking trail through the Mountains called the Cirque De Mafate.

For the first time with a Alaska home grown person was amazed by a view of non-Alaska mountains. Just Kidding

For the first time with a Alaska home grown person was amazed by a view of non-Alaska mountains. Just Kidding

The View as we began our hike

The View as we began our hike

10

11

13

Off we go to the trail .

Off we go to the trail .

Down the mountain side trail

Down the mountain side trail

Jade waiting for Ben to catch up

Jade waiting for Ben to catch up

hiking into the many little villages in the mountains .

hiking into the many little villages in the mountains .

The little huts next to the trail were right on the edge of the mountain

The little huts next to the trail were right on the edge of the mountain

Cross the bridge to Aurere Village.

Cross the bridge to Aurere Village.

One of the little fast Lizards that live here.

One of the little fast Lizards that live here.

Heading down another valley

Heading down another valley

Just Amazing

Just Amazing

Another beautiful village on the trail

Another beautiful village on the trail

Local boy trying to get us to stay at the huts but we choose to camp for free and not pay $15 euros

Local boy trying to get us to stay at the huts but we choose to camp for free and not pay $15 euros

Lots of Church s up here.

Lots of Church s up here.

Looking out from the village.

Looking out from the village.

We begin to hike out the river cannon out wash

We begin to hike out the river cannon out wash

Head down the mountain

Head down the mountain

Trails are close to the cliff edge.

Trails are close to the cliff edge.

just a little water from the river yum! don't worry its treated.

just a little water from the river yum! don’t worry its treated.

down in the out wash on our way back to Dragonsbane

down in the out wash on our way back to Dragonsbane

looking to the ocean

looking to the ocean

Madeit back to the Marina. The office is based on the Sydney Opera House lol.

Madeit back to the Marina. The office is based on the Sydney Opera House lol.

Totally worth the tough hiking and elevation.

Totally worth the tough hiking and elevation.

Thanks Jacques


Made it to Reunion Island

Ended up taken a day and half o sail here. We sailed to the south end of the island to enter St. Perrie Marine but they were full. so we had to reach all all the way north in 30 knot head winds for 38 nautical miles which made us do a night landing. It’s been a adventure so far. We are off for a three day hike through the mountains and then back to the boat.

Thanks,

Jacques

Ps took for ever to find WIFI


Exploring Mauritius Island

In the last 6 days we all have been busy exploring the island of Mauritius and once again theirs to much that can be said in one blog. We have been hiking up the local mountains, walking through the city of Port Louis, sailing up the coast to Grand Bay, driving a car around the entire island exploring. Mauritius if full of a India cultural and South African spirit. The national language is English but everybody speaks french and most things are in written in French. As normal we all get by and have a great time doing so.

Sailing past Gunner Island just north of Mauritius. The sun was just coming up as we passed between the Islands and was navigating our way down the coast to Port Luis.

Sailing past Gunner Island just north of Mauritius. The sun was just coming up as we passed between the Islands and was navigating our way down the coast to Port Luis.

To start our explorations of Maurituis we walked to the bus station to go hike up Corp De Garde Mountain. But Cary split his toe on one of the millions of pavers that are sticking up all over Port Louis.

To start our explorations of Maurituis we walked to the bus station to go hike up Corp De Garde Mountain. But Cary split his toe on one of the millions of pavers that are sticking up all over Port Louis.

Jade and Ben watching the world go by in Port Louis as we bus a half hour to the second highest peak in Mauritius.

Jade and Ben watching the world go by in Port Louis as we bus a half hour to the second highest peak in Mauritius.

About a third of the way up I cought a goat hiking up the mountain with her young. She was a bit surprized.

About a third of the way up I cought a goat hiking up the mountain with her young. She was a bit surprized.

Looking back down the trail at Cary, Ben, and Jade looking out over the plateau  toward Port Louis.

Looking back down the trail at Cary, Ben, and Jade looking out over the plateau toward Port Louis.

A little close up of the gang having fun.

A little close up of the gang having fun.

Nice to see solar power generation farms being used.

Nice to see solar power generation farms being used.

Looking out towards Port Louis.

Looking out towards Port Louis.

Back into Port Louis walking the busy streets and seeing all the venders trying to sell anything and everything.

Back into Port Louis walking the busy streets and seeing all the venders trying to sell anything and everything.

Port Louis City Life

Port Louis City Life

Typical sidewalks in Port Louis

Typical sidewalks in Port Louis

City Life

City Life

Found a micro-Brew in Port Louis and had a great glass of Oktoberfest it is  the season friends.

Found a micro-Brew in Port Louis and had a great glass of Oktoberfest it is the season friends.

After a few beers I checked out the freash market and had to leave after being asked million times to buy something by the venders

After a few beers I checked out the freash market and had to leave after being asked million times to buy something by the venders

As the days speed by we stopped by yesterday at the Chateau De Labourdonnais. Its a old Chateau that housed a wealth family during the beginning times of the sugar cane production in the early 1800's.

As the days speed by we stopped by yesterday at the Chateau De Labourdonnais. Its a old Chateau that housed a wealth family during the beginning times of the sugar cane production in the early 1800’s.

I thought it was cool to look into a mirror in this old Cheatue and capture myself in a mirror that captured the pasts of others because it was the original furniture of the building.

I thought it was cool to look into a mirror in this old Cheatue and capture myself in a mirror that captured the pasts of others because it was the original furniture of the building.

Walking through gardens

Walking through gardens

Had to stop at one of the sugar cane rum distilleries.

Had to stop at one of the sugar cane rum distilleries.

As we drove around the whole island it was covered in sugar cane flied being grown and harvested. It is still there number one export product.

As we drove around the whole island it was covered in sugar cane flied being grown and harvested. It is still there number one export product.

The landscape of Mauritius and its suburbs

The landscape of Mauritius and its suburbs

Thanks,

Jacques


Made it to Mauritius Island

Had a great sail at night as we sailed through the northern Islands of Mauritius. Made to customs before lunch and the crew ran to McDonalds right across the street. Anyway the city is very busy and full of people. Landed in Port Louis

Thanks,

Jacques


Day 2 Passage to Mauritius Island

It has been tough getting my blogs to post underway so far. I post my blogs via SSB Radio and when there is a lot of atmospheric interference I have to try posting at different times of the day. Anyway we are about 130 nautical miles from Mauritius and should be there tomorrow morning. We are going to try fishing today and hopefully we will catch one. All is well onboard.

Current Position: 19deg 53.3min South, 59deg 33.24min East, COG 290deg-M, SOG 5.4kts, WS 17 kts, Swell >1meter, Sunny

Thanks,

Jacques